Pupil Premium 2019

Pupil Premium Reporting to Parents

(Updated Autumn 2018 - reviewed annually)

The Department for Education website states:

  • The Pupil Premium is allocated to children from low-income families who are currently known to be eligible for FSM (Free school meals) in both mainstream and non-mainstream settings and children who have been in Local Authority care, continuously for more than six months.
  • The Government believes the Pupil Premium, which is additional funding, is the best way to address current inequalities to children.
  • It is for schools to decide how to spend Pupil Premium as they are best placed to assess what is needed. But they are held accountable for how they have used funding to support pupils from low income families.

Principles

At Mengham Junior School:

  • We ensure that teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all of the pupils.
  • We ensure that appropriate provision is made for pupils who belong to vulnerable groups.
  • We recognise that not all pupils who are socially disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals.

At Mengham Junior School each child is treated as an individual and interventions are tracked on an individual basis.

Links

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/pupil-premium-how-schools-are-spending-funding-successfullymaximise-achievement

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/pupil-premium

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/pupil-premium-analysis-and-challenge-tools-for-schools

 Pupil premium strategy statement (primary)

   1.    Summary information

School

Mengham Junior School

Academic Year

2018-2019

Total PP budget

£71,280

Date of most recent PP Review

November 2018

Total number of pupils

244

Number of pupils eligible for PP

54

Date for next internal review of this strategy

Spring 2018

 

2.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

 A.    

Pupil premium children can experience a range of factors which together may impact on children’s progress in school.

 B.    

Vocabulary is often weaker for some pupils. This could have an impact on reading, writing and foundation progress.

C.

Handwriting and spelling for pupils eligible for pupil premium is often weaker than of those who are not eligible.

D.

Pupil premium children experience a range of factors that may impact on their social and emotional development.

E.

Pupil premium children can present with working memory and focus and concentration difficulties.

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

F.

Parental engagement (parents’ evening attendance, support with home learning, funding for trips).

G.

Attendance for children with pupil premium is often not in line with national averages.  This has an impact on children’s learning and also on their sense of belonging.

H.

Children eligible for pupil premium funding often don’t receive a healthy balanced diet which may impact on concentration and focus levels.

3.   Desired outcomes

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

A.    

Reading, writing, maths and SPAG to be in line with non-pupil premium children.

broader curriculum outcomes to be in line with non PP children

Outcomes to be in line with non-pupil premium children. 

Monitoring of books, focus of drop-ins and moderation.

Foundation books will also be monitored as will planning to ensure appropriate challenge and support is being provided.

B.    

Writing that reflects an understanding and use of higher level vocabulary.

 

English lead has monitored books and evidence of language generation is clear.  This language is then applied to independent writing.

Children are able to access the end of key stage assessments.

C.    

Handwriting and spellings to be improved. 

 

Evidence in books shows that handwriting meets expected standards at the end of Key stage 2.  Book monitoring shows that handwriting is neat joined and legible.  There is an increase in the number of children achieving their handwriting pen.

Weekly spelling results will reflect an increase in spellings being spelt accurately and these are being spelt accurately in books.

D.    

Children with social and emotional difficulties will be supported in school. 

Pupils eligible for pupil premium will have been offered support with identified needs

Progress will be tracked through ELSA evaluations, Boxall profiles and in pupil progress meetings.

Children recognised as Young Carers will be supported with their emotional and social development by attending fortnightly sessions with Off The Record and in termly extra-curricular activities.

E.     

The needs of children with working memory difficulties will be better understood; attention and focus will be improved as a result.

Staff will have attended training in working memory.

Resources will be created and sued to support areas of need.  Drop-ins will identify these resources being used and attention and concentration levels will have increased.

F.     

Increased parental engagement of all PP families.

 

Number of children reading at home will increase

Termly tracking of parent/teacher meetings, and parent/teacher meetings are positive, parent/carer nurture

information paperwork returned. More parents engaging with the school drop in sessions with the home/school link worker.

G.    

Attendance to be improved for children with low attendance rates.

For two children, home learning to be issued and revision guides.

Children are learning even if for medical reasons they are unable to attend school.  Learning that is missed at school is caught up when they return.

Progress is evident for these children.

Attendance for 2018-19 at least 96% 

A reduction in the number of persistent absentees in line with national average

       

 

Planned expenditure

 

Academic year

2018/19

Review of all pupils takes place every 6 weeks during pupil progress meetings and book monitoring

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

Staff lead

A.  Reading, Writing, Maths and SPAG outcomes to be in line with non PP children

All children to receive Quality First

Teaching.

Disadvantaged children at risk of not

reaching age related expectations at the

end of the academic year receive catch-up

teacher led small intervention groups and

small groups or 1:1 led by learning support

assistants all focusing on additional support

with reading, spelling and mathematics.

All children will be offered the opportunity to read with an adult, or an older child, at least once a week

 

All evidence and research shows that Quality First Teaching is essential for children to make progress and where necessary accelerated progress. This is vital for all children especially disadvantaged children. As stated by the DfE: Disadvantage has a big influence on pupils’ life chances. As the Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission’s 2014 ‘State of the Nation’ report highlights, pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds are: twice as likely to be not in education, employment or training (NEET) and at higher risk of ending up in poverty as adults. We are therefore determined that our disadvantaged children will achieve as well as non-disadvantaged. This targeted teaching improves progress, attainment, aids self-confidence and self-esteem and helps to pre teach so children have a solid understanding of new learning.

EH/OD

B.  Writing that reflects an understanding and use of higher level vocabulary.

We employ a HLTA to support teaching of writing in year 6.

We have purchased Accelerated Reader to support with reading.

We have an ELKLAN trained member of staff who delivers our speech and language programmes.  She also supports children with language and vocabulary building for topics.  

It is shown that children who read regularly and who read a variety of different genres develop a broader vocabulary than those who do not.  Reading regularly has an impact on a child’s willingness and ability to write imaginatively and with a wide vocabulary. 

Speech and language support is very difficult to access through the NHS.

 

SENCo/English lead

C.  Improve handwriting, spelling, vocabulary retention and application that is age expected across the curriculum.

We employ TAs to run a variety of interventions to support with handwriting, spelling and retention.

Spelling support in breakfast club and at lunchtime.

 

Overall, evidence shows that small group tuition is effective and, as a rule of thumb, the smaller the group the better. Tuition in groups of two has a slightly higher impact than in groups of three, but a slightly lower impact than one to one tuition.

EH/OD/English lead

D.  Children with social and emotional difficulties will be supported in school. 

We employ and 2 ELSAs (one who is also FEIPS trained) to provide emotional support to children who are experiencing emotional difficulties.

We also provide a Nurture and Social skills group.

A HLTA provides a Motivating Reluctant Leaners course for children in year 5 which aims to promote meta-cognition and a growth mindset.

 

Evidence shows that metacognition and self-regulation approaches aim to help pupils think about their own learning more explicitly, often by teaching them specific strategies for planning, monitoring and evaluating their learning. Interventions are usually designed to give pupils a repertoire of strategies to choose from and the skills to select the most suitable strategy for a given learning task.

SENCO/EH/OD

E.   The needs of children with working memory difficulties will be better understood; attention and focus will be improved as a result.

Training to be delivered by an EP or member of the speech and language team for whole staff. 

Resources to be used to support barriers to learning.

Working memory has been shown to be a reliable predictor of attainment in numeracy (Baddeley et al., 2011). Consequently, being able to improve working memory appears to offer a means of raising attainment among lower-performing children.

 

F.  Increased parental engagement of all PP families.

Offering a wide range of resources to support learning and healthy lifestyles to be offered at parents’ evenings, including the school nursing team, PCSO and HC3S.

A wide variety of events for parents and the wider community to be invited to (tea parties, Remembrance assemblies).

We will seek to support parents with funding for school trips.

Parents play a crucial role in supporting their children’s learning, and levels of parental engagement are consistently associated with children’s academic outcomes.

 

 

 

G.  At least 96% attendance

Attendance cup for class with highest attendance each week.

10 minutes extra play for the winning class on a Monday.

Letter regarding absence impact to be sent out to all parents.

Information regarding when to keep your child sick to be put on school website for parents.

Text/telephone parents on the first day of absence if we have not heard from a parent of a child who is absent.

Minibus to be used to pick up children who are persistent non-attenders/those who are persistently late.

Attendance improves outcomes for children. Children do not miss out on essential learning.  The routines children develop around attendance and punctuality at school are the same as the expectations of any future employer in the world of work. High attainment, confidence with peers and staff and future aspirations depend on good attendance.

 

 

 

 

 

EH/OD/TC

         

 

School statistics for the financial year 2017/18 (April 2017 to March 2018)

Total number of Pupils on roll

203

 

 

Total number of free school meals (FSM)

 

29 children

14 % of the school

 

Total number of Free school meals pupils (ever 6- have received FSM at any point in the last 6 years)

29% of the school

58 @ £1320

£76,560

Total number of service pupils

 

2% of the school

4 children@ £300

£ 1,200

 

Proposed spending of Pupil Premium money 2017-18

Strategies

Objective

Cost

How will we measure the impact on the children and their achievement?

Additional teaching staff in KS2 to support boosting

To reduce class sizes providing better provision for the most vulnerable children.

£37,392

End of Key Stage 2 results for pupils eligible for pupil premium in 2017-18 were as follows:

 

Age Related Expectations

Greater Depth Standards

 

School

National

School

National

Reading

80

80

20              

33

Writing

93             

83

13

24

Maths

53             

81

13

28

Combined

Reading Writing and maths

53%

70%

7%

12%

 

 

Of the 41 children in this cohort, 15 children were disadvantaged.  This equates to 34.1%.  This compares to a local authority percentage of 21.3%.

 

Parental contact for families of pupil premium has been enhanced through the work of our home/school link worker and through increased exposure to teaching staff before and after school.

 

The use of HLTAs has allowed for small group work to take place resulting in better provision for the most vulnerable children.  This has also enabled specific skills to be taught to children with gaps in their learning.

 

The motivating reluctant learners group, run by an HLTA had positive outcomes for children with a fixed mindset and who needed resilience support.

 

HLTAs receive same in house training as class teachers and as a result their pedagogy is regularly reviewed.

Library texts are more engaging and a wider range aimed at reluctant boys.

 

IPads have allowed for more children to be able to access software.  Children do not have to share 1:2 and therefore learning time is increased.

 

No child missed out on a trip due to parental income. 

We were able to offer a wide range of clubs during and after school. 

 

Interventions to develop social and emotional skills have allowed for a calm school environment.  This has a positive impact on the learning environment for all children. 

 

Book clubs have provided extra reading opportunities for reluctant/non-readers.

 

Structured play has supported vulnerable children with social skills.  This has reduced the number of playground incidents.  A wider range of activites are being played at lunchtime.

 

Motivating reluctant learners’ intervention.

To improve confidence, self-worth and develop positive attitudes to learning.  To develop a growth mind-set approach to learning.

Sports Leaders

To improve the leadership skills of children.  To encourage sports involvement.  To build self-worth and confidence.

Nurture group

To develop children’s social skills and ability to work collaboratively with others.

£1391

 

Purchase of IPads

To enhance learning.

£10,000

Small group ‘book clubs’

To develop a love of reading and provide extra reading opportunities to reluctant readers.

£2258

Additional reading and maths sessions

Small reading/maths sessions that allow specific reading and maths skills to be developed.

£9348

Structured play sessions

To support children with social skills and communication at lunchtimes.

£5265

Spelling support in breakfast club and at lunchtime.   

To provide spelling practise opportunities for children who do not practise at home.

£877.50

ELSA FEIPS training and delivery of ELSA groups and FEIPS support.

To provide support to children who have social, emotional and mental health needs. Training ensures our ELSA is up-to-date with current initiatives and is trained to deliver programmes.

£10,195

 

£600

Supporting clubs, trips and residential.

To ensure all children have the opportunity to take part in the school’s enrichment activities.

£1000

 

 

£78,326.50

 

 

Total amount of Pupil Premium received April 2017

 

 

£75,240

  

Areas of spending

 

Actions focused on learning in the curriculum

  

 

Examples of these include partly funding an extra teacher for booster, extension and interventions. There is also a commitment towards measuring the impact of interventions and tailoring them for individual pupils as well as high quality teaching and learning.

 

Actions focused on emotional, social and behavioural issues

 

 

Examples of these include using the expertise of Behaviour Support Teams, maintaining the high quality training for our ELSA and funding extra-curricular activities.

 

 

Actions focused on enrichment beyond the curriculum

  

Examples of these include trips and visitors who bring additional expertise to our children and an investment in ICT.

 

 

Actions focused on families and the community

 

Examples include family support through our ELSA, Triple P for our parents and engagement through family activities.

 

Proposed spending of Pupil Premium money 2016-17

Strategies

Objective

Cost

How will we measure the impact on the children and their achievement?

Additional teaching staff in KS2 to support boosting

To reduce class sizes providing better provision for the most vulnerable children.

£32,835

End of Key Stage 2 results for pupils eligible for pupil premium in 2017 were as follows:

Age Related expectations

Reading

 

National

 

Writing

 

National

 

SPAG

 

National

 

Maths

 

National

 

Combined

Reading Writing and maths

 

National

 

 

Of the 60 children in this cohort, 24 children were disadvantaged.  Additionally, 3 children with special educational needs were not entered for the reading SATs paper. 

Parental contact for families of pupil premium has been enhanced through the work of our home/school link worker.

Reduced class sizes as a result of small group support provided better provision for the most vulnerable children.

Engaging resources for enhancing teaching and learning have allowed more children to be motivated by their learning.

HLTAs receive same in house training as class teachers and as a result their pedagogy is regularly reviewed.

Library texts are more engaging and a wider range aimed at reluctant boys.

No child missed out on a trip due to parental income. 

We were able to offer a wide range of clubs during and after school.

ELSA evaluations show children have improved learning behaviours.  This has a positive impact on the learning environment for all children.

Purchase of extra ICT in school.

To provide resources for boosting, teaching and learning.

£10,000

My maths

Children to be able to access independent maths boosting/catch up resources.

£280

Investment in Continuous Professional Development of teachers.

Employment of Higher Level Teaching Assistant to support boosting and release teachers for coaching sessions.

Three teachers attending a yearlong research programme on an area linked to the School Improvement Programme-led by Hampshire.

£17,704

 

£1200

Employment of ELSA to work with vulnerable children and families- particular focus on supporting attendance.

Nurture sessions twice a week.

To ensure that any child with emotional and or social needs is fully supported so that they can fully access the school curriculum and are emotionally ready to learn.

To develop children’s social skills and ability to work collaboratively with others.

£10,094

 

 

 

£1391

Supporting clubs, trips and residential.

To ensure all children have the opportunity to take part in the school’s enrichment activities.

£500

Extending library and guided reading texts to provide high interest quality texts.

Subscriptions to First News, Aquila and The Week magazines.

To inspire reading for all children through different and engaging texts.

£5000

  Areas of spending

 

Actions focused on learning in the curriculum

 

 

Examples of these include partly funding an extra teacher for booster, extension and interventions. There is also a commitment towards measuring the impact of interventions and tailoring them for individual pupils as well as high quality teaching and learning.

 

Actions focused on emotional, social and behavioural issues

 

 

Examples of these include using the expertise of Behaviour Support Teams, maintaining the high quality training for our ELSA and funding extra-curricular activities.

 

 

 

 

Actions focused on enrichment beyond the curriculum

 

 

Examples of these include trips and visitors who bring additional expertise to our children and an investment in ICT.

 

 

Actions focused on families and the community

 

 

Examples include family support through our ELSA, Triple P for our parents and engagement through family activities.

  

Pupil Premium in 2015-16 academic year

In the 2015-16 financial year, Mengham Junior School received £67,320pupil premium allocation. The funding is used to improve outcomes for pupils eligible for Free School Meals or those to be from low income families. The table shows how the pupil premium has been allocated by the school.

 

Strategies

Objective

Cost

Impact on Pupil Outcomes

 

Additional teaching staff in KS2 (2 additional classes)

To reduce class sizes providing better provision for the most vulnerable children.

£47,800

 

End of Key Stage 2 results for pupils eligible for pupil premium in 2016 were as follows:

 

Age Related expectations

Reading

53%

National

71%

Writing

79%

National

79%

SPAG

80%

National

76%

Maths

58%

National

75%

Combined

Reading Writing and maths

42%

National

60%

 

19 children out of the cohort of 45 were considered to be disadvantaged. Of these disadvantaged children 2 were not entered for the SATs tests as they were children with Special Educational Needs.

 

Parental contact for families of pupil premium has been enhanced.

There are no children requiring continuous support at lunchtime through the ASPIRE Club.

 

To increase the number of children eligible for FSMs on track for 2 full levels progress in reading, writing and maths and the number of children eligible for FSMs on track to achieve age-related expectations.

£10,561

 

 

Additional funding for booster teacher 

 

INSPIRE Maths resources and training for all teachers

 

To ensure the number of children eligible for FSMs who are on track to achieve and exceed age-related expectations is at least in line with National averages. 

 

£4582

 

 

Employment of ELSA to work with vulnerable children and families- particular focus on supporting attendance.

Nurture sessions twice a week.

To ensure that any child with emotional and or social needs is fully supported so that they can fully access the school curriculum and are emotionally ready to learn.

To develop children’s social skills and ability to work collaboratively with others.

£10,941

£1,391

 

Supporting clubs, trips and residential. 

 

To ensure all children have the opportunity to take part in the school’s enrichment activities.

£900

 

 

 

Pupil Premium in 2014-15 academic year

In the 2014-15 financial year, Mengham Junior School received £76,000 pupil premium allocation. The funding is used to improve outcomes for pupils eligible for Free School Meals or those to be from low income families. The table shows how the pupil premium has been allocated by the school.

Strategies

Objective

Cost

Impact on Pupil Outcomes

 

Additional teaching staff in KS2 (2 additional classes)

To reduce class sizes and un-mix the year groups providing better provision for the most vulnerable children.

£47,800

2 staff

End of Key Stage 2 results for pupils eligible for pupil premium in 2015 were as follows:

 

Level 4+

Level 5+

Expected progress

More than expected progress

Reading

91%

 

55%

 

100%

 

55%

 

National

83%

 

34%

 

 

Writing

91%

 

45%

 

100%

 

55%

 

National

79%

 

22%

 

 

SPAG

91%

 

64%

 

 

National

71%

 

43%

 

 

Maths

82%

 

45%

 

91%

 

36%

 

National

80%

 

28%

 

 

 

Expected and more than expected progress exceeds the national averages. There is no significant gap in school for disadvantaged children.

Other impact is measurable through children’s growth in self-esteem, dealing with difficult situations and approach to learning.

37% of pupil premium pupils attended a club with 19% of attending more than one. 100% attended a school "camp out"

Parental contact for families of pupil premium has been enhanced.

There are no children requiring continuous support at lunchtime through the ASPIRE Club.

 

 

To increase the number of children eligible for FSMs on track for 2 full levels progress in reading, writing and maths and the number of children eligible for FSMs on track to achieve age-related expectations.

£7,000

 

Pie Corbett Talk for Writing Training for all teachers

 

Booster teacher employed April – August 2014

£11,080

 

Employment of ELSA to work with vulnerable children and families- particular focus on supporting attendance.

Nurture sessions twice a week.

To ensure that any child with emotional and or social needs is fully supported so that they can fully access the school curriculum and are emotionally ready to learn.

To develop children’s social skills and ability to work collaboratively with others.

£10,941

£1,391

 

Supporting clubs, trips and residential.

To ensure all children have the opportunity to take part in the school’s enrichment activities.

£600